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Tap the Power of the Universe!
Good News Magazine
August 1985
Volume: VOL. XXXII, NO. 7
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Tap the Power of the Universe!
John A Halford   
Church of God

Born: April 22, 1941
Died: October 21, 2014
Ambassador College: 1966
Office: ACE - Minister

Bachelor's Degree in Theology from Ambassador.

The forces binding matter together point to the immense power of the Creator God. That great God offers to share His power with us to help us overcome.

   One night, long ago, King David looked up into the vastness of space. As he meditated on the power and majesty of the God who created the Universe, he learned an important lesson.
   He was inspired to write: "The heavens declare the glory of God; the skies proclaim the work of his hands... night after night they display knowledge" (Psalm 19:1-2, New International Version). David wrote so that others might learn the lesson, too.
   They didn't.
   And so, about 3,000 years later, another group of men looked out at the night. It was just before dawn on July 16, 1945, and these men were about to test the world's first atomic bomb, in the desert of New Mexico.
   It worked.
   In a split second, the world's first atomic weapon released the power of 20,000 tons of conventional explosive.
   Three weeks later, a second bomb was exploded. But this was no test. It was dropped over the Japanese city of Hiroshima, and in a flash of heat and light, the city was destroyed and 100,000 people were killed or injured. Conquered and conquerors alike were awed by the power of this terrible new weapon.
   "My God, what have we done?" asked the copilot of the Enola Gay, the B-29 bomber that carried the bomb to Japan.

The power of the atom

   What they had done was turn a small piece of uranium about one gram, or a 30th of an ounce into raw energy. Scientists had long suspected that it was possible. It took the urgency of war for them to discover how.
   But when they did, even those who worked on the project were sobered by the implications of the power they could unleash. "I had gooseflesh all over me when I realized what this meant for the future of humanity," wrote one scientist.
   U.S. President Harry Truman summed it up in a warning to the people of Japan the day after Hiroshima was destroyed. "It is a harnessing of the basic power of the universe. The force from which the sun draws its power... if [the Japanese] do not now accept our terms of surrender, they may expect a rain of ruin from the air, the like of which has never been seen on this earth."
   President Truman was right. Man had indeed harnessed the power of the universe, the very force from which the sun draws its power.
   The atom bomb that devastated Hiroshima was a mere firecracker compared to the weapons of today. Now we measure their destructive power in megatons one megaton is the equivalent of a 300-mile-long trainload of conventional explosives! But we have become so accustomed to such figures that they no longer impress us.
   We should look again at the power of the atom. It is indeed the force by which mankind will bring himself to the edge of destruction. But there is also an encouraging and reassuring side to it. By splitting the atom, we learn or could learn, if we were willing a little more about the awesome power of God.
   So let me give you a quick and, I hope, not too hard to understand physics lesson.

Before nuclear physics

   For most of his approximately 6,000 years on earth, man has been surprisingly ignorant about the true nature of his surroundings. The ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece and Rome made some progress in science. But after the fifth century, man's knowledge hardly advanced for 1,000 years.
   During the Dark Ages, science, magic and witchcraft were considered to be much the same thing. Such scientists as there were wasted their time trying to find the elixir of life or a way to turn lead into gold. They thought the earth was flat and that angels pushed the sun and stars around it. Superstition rather than science guided men's thinking.
   Then, in the middle of the 16th century, knowledge began to expand rapidly again. Navigators discovered that they could sail around the world without falling off. Copernicus showed that the earth was not the center of the universe, but just another planet in orbit around the sun. Galileo's experiments in astronomy and physics challenged some ideas that had remained unchanged (and wrong) since the days of Aristotle.
   The English scientist Sir Isaac Newton demonstrated how physical phenomena could be measured and quantified. He made it possible for scientists to build on their discoveries, rather than conduct isolated experiments. Newton realized there was a system of law governing gravity, mass, force, acceleration and motion. This laid the groundwork for the advances that made our modern world possible.
   For two centuries nobody seriously questioned the validity of Newton's laws. In the 18th and 19th centuries it was considered indisputable that physical matter (the elements) and energy (heat and light) were separate entities that could neither be created nor destroyed. The amount of matter and the amount of energy in the universe were presumed fixed.
   Matter could change its form through chemical reaction. Energy could also change heat into light, for example. But matter could not turn into energy or vice versa. Or so they thought.

The theory of relativity

   It was Albert Einstein who first understood that this was not totally true. He put forward a theory that predicted that physical matter and energy were not separate that they were, in a sense, interchangeable. Matter could be transformed into energy, and energy could be transformed into matter.
   This "theory of relativity" rocked the scientific world. This article is no place to try to explain in detail these incredibly complicated ideas. But Dr. Einstein summed them up with the now famous equation E = mc2 (where E = energy, m = mass and c = the speed of light, which is about 186,000 miles a second). What this means is that if you can
In the reaction that devastated Hiroshima, only about a 30th of an ounce of uranium was changed into energy. Think of the power locked into matter!
transform physical matter into energy, the amount of energy produced is equal to the mass of the matter times the speed of light multiplied by itself (i.e., 186,000 x 186,000).
   You don't need to be a genius to realize that if this line of reasoning is true, even a small amount of matter can produce an astonishing amount of energy.

Splitting the atom

   But how do you turn matter into energy? To do this, you would have to literally split the atom or, to be specific, the nucleus of the atom. And that is easier said than done.
   Scientists had shown that the atom, once thought to be the smallest possible particle of matter, is composed of even smaller, subatomic particles neutrons, protons and electrons among them. The protons and neutrons make up a central core or nucleus of an atom, while the electrons whirl around the nucleus rather like the planets orbit the sun, only much faster billions of times in a millionth of a second. (The makeup of the atom is actually even more complex than this, but this will serve to make the point.)
   These components of the atom each have an electrical charge negative, positive or neutral. The electrons whirling around in orbit have a negative charge. The nucleus is made of neutrons, which have a neutral charge, and protons, which have a positive charge.
   Think of these charges like the opposite poles of a magnet and you'll get the idea. If you have played with magnets, you've discovered that like poles repel each other, while opposite poles attract. It's the same with electrical charges.
   So, since the nucleus of an atom is made up of neutral neutrons and positively charged protons, what stops the protons from repelling each other or, in other words, why doesn't an atom's nucleus fly apart? (Again, think of it as trying to hold the like poles of two powerful magnets together. It takes a surprising amount of strength, and as soon as you let up, the magnets immediately push themselves away from each other.)
   There must be a force that counteracts the repelling power of the protons and binds them together in the nucleus. Physicists call this the "strong force."
   It is indeed so strong that, for centuries, nobody even suspected its existence. So firm was its grip on the core of the atom that no force available to man could even begin to persuade it to let go. Thus it was hardly surprising that scientists thought the atom was the smallest possible division of matter.
   In the 19th century it was discovered that some elements had a strange property. They gave off radiation or, as we say now, were radioactive. Physicists realized that the atoms of these elements were slowly disintegrating. It happened very slowly so slowly and unobtrusively that for thousands of years nobody even suspected it.
   Strange, isn't it? For millennia, alchemists had wasted their time trying to turn one element into another, yet here it was happening naturally under their noses all the time. Uranium, for example, given enough time, will decay down to lead, a nonradioactive element.
   Experiments showed that when one element is transformed into another, not all of it is changed. A very small percentage of matter is changed into energy.
   But if Einstein was right and E really did equal mc2, that still meant a lot of energy would be released as an atom decayed. Just before the Second World War, scientists learned how to speed up the decay by splitting the atom with a nuclear reactor, releasing the power in the atom.
   When a radioactive element decays in nature, a small amount of energy is produced. For example, one pound of radioactive uranium gives as much energy as is produced by 5,000 pounds of gasoline. But it needs a thousand million years to do it. In a nuclear reactor (or a nuclear bomb) the atom is literally split in two. Much greater amounts of energy are released, suddenly and violently.
   In the reaction that caused the devastation at Hiroshima, only about 1/1000th of the uranium was transformed into energy about a 30th of an ounce.
   Think of the power that was locked into that speck of matter, when it was transformed into heat and radiation! And that was a very small bomb.
   A hydrogen bomb is many times more powerful than an atomic bomb. It takes an atomic explosion to produce enough energy to start the reaction.
   But when the reaction does take place, it is with a flash of light brighter than the sun. Millions of degrees of heat are generated. That is why it is called a thermonuclear reaction. With the making of the hydrogen bomb, man has actually succeeded in duplicating the force that drives the sun.

The incredible sun

   Look up at the sun. What you are seeing is a continuous chain of nuclear explosions in a reaction of unimaginable power.
   The sun is actually a giant thermonuclear reactor. It is composed mainly of hydrogen that is gradually changing into helium. Deep inside the sun's core tremendous
How can we even begin to comprehend the power God has available? But God has a great purpose for man. He is eager to share His power, but only if it is used properly.
gravitational forces, 250 billion times those of earth, compress hydrogen atoms until the heat and pressure force a thermonuclear reaction to take place.
   Energy released is thrust toward the surface, but the sun's great mass pulls it back. It may take up to 15 million years for the energy to jostle its way through to the surface and escape as heat and radiation.
   Scientists estimate that nearly four million tons of hydrogen are transformed into energy every second in the nuclear holocaust on our sun. (Remember, it took only a 30th of an ounce to destroy Hiroshima.)
   And then stop and think about this: Our sun is only one star in our galaxy of 100 million stars. And there are probably 100 million other galaxies, each with another 100 million stars. That makes oh, never mind. The point is that there is an almost inconceivable amount of power locked up in this awesome universe that surrounds us.
   God made that universe by and out of His own power. "For He commanded and they were created," the Bible tells us (Psalm 148:5).

The power of God

   How can we even begin to comprehend the power that God has available? How much energy had to be held together to forge the atoms of even the most commonplace and seemingly insignificant of God's creations a sparrow, a spider or a leaf?
   If all the energy compacted in a gram of matter could be released (it can't by any means now known to science), it would supply as much energy as Hoover Dam produces in about 18 and a half hours. Put another way, the matter in a 150-pound person, if converted completely to energy, would supply as much energy as Hoover Dam could produce in 144 years.
   Yet God made giant stars 1,000 times the size of our sun!
   Can we ever begin to appreciate just how great God is? No wonder He could never allow mortal man to see the full power that radiates from Him. Nothing made of flesh and blood could survive that experience.
   But God has, through His creation, given us hints, mere suggestions, of the immensity of His power. "For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes are clearly seen, being understood by the things that are made, even His eternal power and Godhead, so that they [those who don't or won't believe in God] are without excuse," wrote Paul (Romans 1:20).
   The physical things God has made can teach us if we have eyes to see. But, sad to say, many scientists today have rejected the very idea of God.
   Never before have they known so much about the universe. Never before has there been more reason to believe in a Creator. Not so long ago, sailors were afraid to sail over the horizon for fear they would fall off the earth. Now we travel into space routinely, discovering, measuring, analyzing and quantifying. And every breakthrough leads inexorably toward one conclusion that there must have been a time when all that we see began.
   But that implies a Creator, and that is something that many scientists cannot or will not admit. And so they " became futile in their thoughts, and their foolish hearts were darkened" (verse 21).
   Perhaps if scientists had been willing to acknowledge the awesome power of God, they would never have dared tamper with those forces that bind the universe together.
   In God's hands, those forces are under control and are used only to do good. He has carefully regulated the inferno on the sun so that it makes life possible on earth.
   But what has man done with nuclear power? Certainly there have been numerous peaceful industrial applications, although some argue that even these are hazardous. But our potential to split the atom is also lurking in the warheads of the weapons that will destroy all life if they ever are used.
   Those weapons may be even more destructive than we dare think. President Truman threatened a "rain of ruin" on Japan. He didn't know then that those relatively little bombs were paving the way for a possible nuclear winter that would eventually eliminate those who survived the initial blasts of nuclear bombs.
   While the human heart is ruled by anger, lust and greed, it would be wiser to leave the "basic power of the universe" alone.
   But it's too late now. Once the first atomic bomb went off successfully, the die was cast. A chain reaction began. The bombs got bigger, and Bible prophecy tells us that man will use the principle of E = mc2 to batter the earth to the point where it can no longer sustain life.
   Then, and only then, will the people of this world look out to the heavens and ask once again, "My God, what have we done?"

The lesson of Psalm 19

   King David lived long before the days of nuclear power. He knew nothing of the theory of relativity or the splitting of atoms. But he did understand that there was a great Creator God. He also knew that God was to be respected and obeyed and worshiped.
   When David saw the immensity of God's power manifested in the universe, he was inspired and humbled. "When I consider Your heavens, the work of Your fingers, the moon and the stars, which You have ordained," David marveled, "what is man that You are mindful of him?" (Psalm 8:3-4).
   But David understood what man was, and why God was mindful of him. God has a great purpose for man. David realized that God was not selfish or power mad. He was eager to share His power, but only if it were used properly.
   Before King David or you and I can share the great power of God, we must qualify. We saw at Hiroshima what even a small fragment of just one aspect of that power, wrongly used, can do. Before God shares all His power with us in the Kingdom of God, we must show Him that we will use it responsibly.
   How do we show God this?
   Let King David teach us, because although David sometimes let his mind soar in the magnificence of the universe, he kept his feet firmly on the ground. He continued in Psalm 19: "The law of God is perfect, converting the soul; the testimony of the Lord is sure... the statutes of the Lord are right... the commandment of the Lord is pure, enlightening the eyes... by them Your servant is warned, and in keeping them there is great reward" (Psalm 19:7-11).
   David knew that God rules His Kingdom and regulates His power with the great law of love. Before humans can inherit that Kingdom, they must show that they will live in obedience to that law. Only then can God be sure that the great reserves of power will always be used for good and peaceful purposes.
   So God watches us now, while we are still relatively powerless, to see how we live. He expects us to take seriously even the smallest details of His law, which is far more binding than even the strong force that holds the earth together, or the power that constrains the energy locked in the stars. "Heaven and earth will pass away, but My words will by no means pass away," said Jesus Christ (Luke 21:33).
   King David believed that. And so, when this righteous king looked into the heavens, he was filled with longing for the time when he could share that splendor as a born child of God. But he knew he had to qualify, and he knew he needed help. So he prayed, "Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in Your sight, o Lord, my strength and my redeemer" (Psalm 19:14).
   God did help David. He gave him power not the power of the atom, but the even greater power of the Holy Spirit. He began the greatest reaction process of all the transformation of the very nature of David. One day, David will be resurrected in power and glory.
   God will do the same for you. He will share His Spirit with you just a little, for now. But you must use it properly to overcome, to obey God's law, to do good and serve others.
   Then one day, you, too, will be welcomed by the great Creator God into His Kingdom, to live with Him in full brilliance and majesty and share His awesome power forever.

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Good News MagazineAugust 1985VOL. XXXII, NO. 7
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